It turns out my Volvo supports the bluetooth headset protocol but not the bluetooth

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(Daniel Bull) #1

It turns out my Volvo supports the bluetooth headset protocol but not the bluetooth stereo protocol, this is fine as I could use the 3.5mm audio jack but it meant I couldn’t pause or skip the music without picking up my phone.

So what I did was 3D print a set of headset controls which directly swap in place of the coin holder and plug in between the phone and audio in on the car.

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(Mike Kelly) #2

that’s a great idea. Is this the same principle as the clickers on your headphones?

(John Helmuth) #3

Very nice job on replacing the coin holder, that looks perfect.

I have a similar problem with my Nissan Cube, and Subaru Forester… I’m interested in the circuit you used for this, and what kind of phone you have. Any link love with that information?

(Raspberry Pi Spy) #4

Very nice. This is an excellent example of real 3d printing. I’ve just ordered one and am keen to avoid the printing 50 Yoda heads trap.

(Markus Granberg) #5

Good job!

(Daniel Bull) #6

@Mike_Kelly_Mike_Make yes absolutely identical. Basically play/pause is achieved by shorting out the microphone pins and forward and back are shorting out via different resistor values.

(Daniel Bull) #7

@John_Helmuth I used these values with my HTC One Android Phone; http://i.stack.imgur.com/1MWRM.jpg, you basically connect them between ground and the mic pin. The only other thing I had to do was simulate a microphone (I used a 10k resistor) for when none of the buttons are pressed. Ahh here you go https://hackadaycom.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/android-phone-control-cable-hack-e1288798989436.jpg?w=470&h=284 I think thats like what I did. This is missing the microphone simulator resistor though. Without that my Android phone presumed you had headphones not a headset and ignored the controls.

WARNING: Apple headsets use different resistor values because Apple patented the values so nobody could make products compatible with iPhones without paying them money (I kid you not). They are a pain in the bum as they deliberately fragmented the market and made it so headphones are not compatible between Android and iPhones. But hey what do we expect from them…

(John Helmuth) #8

Thank you!

I also did a little digging after I asked you this here, and came across this instructable: http://www.instructables.com/id/Galaxy-Nexus-and-others-headset-remote-with-medi/

(Daniel Bull) #9

Yep that looks like the same sort of values…