Are there any examples of Fastled in commercial use out there?

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(turgan s) #1

Are there any examples of Fastled in commercial use out there? I read the Mit license, but not familiar with detailed applications of it. Is commercial use possible? https://github.com/FastLED/FastLED/blob/master/LICENSE

(Jason Coon) #2

Standard disclaimer: I am neither a lawyer nor the creator of this fantastic library.

According to Wikipedia:

“The MIT license permits reuse within https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proprietary_software provided that all copies of the licensed software include a copy of the MIT License terms and the copyright notice.”

(Daniel Garcia) #3

Commercial use is possible - in fact, there’s a number of commercial products out there that are using FastLED under the hood - I do appreciate when folks let me know that they’re using FastLED for a product, mostly out of curiosity. I have also, in the past, done contracting work specifically to support commercial projects that are being done with FastLED.

(Mark and I have joked about putting a “let us know, give us two” clause in the license - as in, if you use FastLED to make a thing you’re selling, give us one each to play with! : )

(Jason Coon) #4

I absolutely agree with that clause! @Daniel_Garcia , @Mark_Kriegsman (and @Sam_Guyer ), pick anything (in stock) on my Tindie store, send me your address, and I will gladly send them to you! https://www.tindie.com/stores/jasoncoon/

(Marc MERLIN) #5

IANAL, but been working on open source for 20+ years, and gave a talk about doing open source right within a company (in my case Google). Basically both MIT and BSD allow you to use the code in any commercial product and you don’t have to share your changes, open your code or anything. You should if you can, but the license does not ask you to.
The one requirement is that you have to credit the code and the license in your documentation given with the product (in paper or electronically).
This is exactly that last part that Intel blatantly and knowingly violated when they put minix (BSD license) on all their AMT CPUs, and never mentioned it anywhere or credited the project or its license. Intel is probably the biggest open source violator (in volume) in the world as a result, which is ironic given that they were trying hard to be a good open source citizen for over 10 years. Sad…